Parole Programs for Filipino WWII Veterans

Starting June 8, 2016, USCIS will be implementing a new parole program for Filipino World War II Veterans.  The parole program will allow family members of certain Filipino WWII veterans, who have approved family-based visa petitions, to receive parole to come to the U.S. while they wait for their visa to become available.  As you […]

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Rescission of Green Cards

There are some instances where USCIS wrongfully approves an application for adjustment of status.  In such cases, pursuant to INA Section 246(a), the Attorney General may rescind that green card within five years of the time of adjustment.  The government will initiate the rescission by sending the person a Notice of Intent to Rescind the […]

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Getting Out of Immigration Detention

In fiscal year 2015, the U.S. government removed, or deported, 235,413 foreign nationals from the U.S.  65,539 of those removals were those removed within the U.S., and 91% of those interior removals were previously convicted of a crime.  The total number of removals are down from previous years.  For example in fiscal year 2012, the […]

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Adjustment of Status As A Crewman

One of the ways that a foreign national can adjust status in the U.S. is if there is a visa immediately available to them, and they were inspected and admitted lawfully to the U.S.  For example, if Jane enters the U.S. on a B-1/B-2 Visitor visa and was inspected and admitted into the U.S. by […]

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Deportation Defense

Deportation proceedings, or removal proceedings, are initiated by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security for an array of different reasons.  Those reasons can include criminal issues, prior fraud or misrepresentations, or just being out of lawful status in the U.S.  In any event, the proceedings start once an individual is served with a Notice to […]

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The Naturalization Process

The process by which a foreign national becomes a U.S. citizen is called, naturalization.  Generally speaking, one must be 18 years or older, be a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) for at least five years preceding the date of filing the application, have continuously lived in the U.S. for at least five years prior to filing […]

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