More Updates On Being A Public Charge

In 2018 USCIS proposed changing the rules on what is considered a “public charge” for inadmissibility purposes. In 2019, USCIS published the final rules on it, and litigation ensued. The case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court and on January 27, 2020, the Court found that the proposed regulations were valid. As […]

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2019 In Review

2019 has again shown our current administration’s continued dedication to address our immigration system. Many continue to be filled with more anxiety and confusion than they have ever felt before, and not without reason. Although the future is uncertain, our past is not, and there have been some changes in 2019 that are worth reviewing. […]

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Future of Dreamers

On November 12, 2019, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a seminal case regarding Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. DACA was initiated in 2012 by President Obama, which allowed certain childhood arrivals to the U.S., obtain an employment authorization card, and work lawfully in the U.S. Although it did not confer […]

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Being a Financial Sponsor For An Immigrant

In May of 2019, the President issued a memorandum that emphasized the legal responsibilities of a financial sponsor, and the potential enforcement actions the government can take. Since 1997, U.S. laws have required that an intending immigrant have a sponsor, which usually is the petitioner, and a joint sponsor if the petitioner does not qualify. […]

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The Importance of Your Vote

It seems as though the nation has been more divided than ever due to the recent, drastic changes to our country’s policies, especially regarding immigration law. Families are being held in Mexico while they await the processing of their case in court, the Filipino World War II Veteran Parole program is on the chopping block, […]

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Public Charge Issues in Obtaining a Green Card

On October 15, 2019, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) will implement a new policy regarding a provision in the law regarding an immigrant’s application for a green card and whether they will be a public charge. Currently, the law states that an immigrant is inadmissible if they are determined to be a public […]

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Know Your Rights If ICE Stops You

If you are reading or listening to the news, you will probably know that the current administration’s priority is to deport undocumented individuals living in the U.S., as well as keep undocumented people out. Although the U.S. government is prioritizing the individuals it wants to deport, it is not discriminating against people who they want […]

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Effect of Divorce on Green Card

A common way of obtaining lawful status in the U.S. is through marriage to a citizen or lawful permanent resident.  However, many are unaware that if the lawful residency was obtained based on a marriage that is less than two years old, the residency is considered conditional.  A conditional residency means that the authorized residency […]

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Policy Changes at USCIS That Can Mean Deportation

On September 11, 2018, U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS) implemented a new policy regarding rejection or denial of applications due to incomplete or inaccurate filings. In the past, if information or a document was missing from a filing, USCIS would issue a Request for Evidence (“RFE”), allowing the applicant to provide the missing information […]

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